Client and Connector Stories

​Benjamin Hao – Jack’s Pizza

“For newcomer business owners, the first priority is a good brand,” says Benjamin Hao. Last year, he and his wife Grace bought Jack’s Pizza, a Charlottetown favourite for 20 years. But their decision wasn’t just about profit: “We wanted to keep local residents happy with the brand they love and engage with our new community.”
 
They see pizza as a metaphor for newcomers’ lives. The dough is the foundation, “an interface to learn about the new culture. Through pizza, we can live here in peace and friendship, so the next generation can grow and have a better future,” Benjamin explains, mentioning the couple’s nine-year-old son.
 
But they’ve faced some challenges. Because of the recent coronavirus pandemic, they had to temporarily close their Cavendish location, to focus on maintaining quality and service in Charlottetown. But sales during the pandemic haven’t dropped, thanks to savvy business strategies. Social media promotions, such as chances to win food or gift cards, have attracted new customers. “We get lots of positive feedback,” Benjamin says. “And customers are happy to get free pizza.”
 
Loyal social media followers haven’t been alone in getting free pizza. Benjamin and Grace, collaborating with PEI’s Chinese community, donated 150 pizzas to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital. He says, “this is just one example of how the Chinese community has contributed.” Read more

​Ranjit and Priya Chatterjee – Instant Imprints

In bringing the Instant Imprint brands to PEI, Ranjit and Priya Chatterjee have “a burning desire to succeed and offer tremendous customer service,” in the couple’s own words.
 
Their franchise, which opened in August 2019 after the couple did extensive training, provides a range of customized marketing products, from apparel to signs to printed materials. Customer feedback has been very positive, says Ranjit: “Seeing the smiles when they get their end result, and knowing we’ve succeeded in meeting their expectations, makes us happy.”
Because 90% of orders are managed in-house, Ranjit says, they can finish jobs faster than competitors. But perhaps their biggest advantage is the product range: “A customer comes in with a picture on his phone of his family or dog – we can put it on a mug, a t-shirt, a postcard! They dream and we build it!”
 
“And it’s about the personal touch, the relationships we’re developing,” Priya adds. Read more

​David & Josephine Lau – goji’s

Headquartered in Moncton, New Brunswick, goji’s brands itself as the “neighbourhood treatery” — and David & Josephine Lau are doing their best to make their Charlottetown franchise just that. “We’re here to serve the local community and bring joy,” David says, “especially to kids. And I’m proud we’ve gotten so much support.”
 
The couple are also delighted with the assistance they’ve received from PEI Connectors. Before moving here, David had never owned a business — he was a train engineer in Hong Kong. Newly arrived on PEI, the couple heard about PEI Connectors from friends and got in touch: “The program officers were very, very helpful,” David says, nodding. “They told us who to contact and arranged seminars to help us learn about how to start and buy a business.” The couple were also paired with a local business owner who shared expertise and knowledge. Read more

​Ji Peng – Everich Import & Export

When Ji Peng incorporated Everich Import & Export in the fall of 2016, he already knew the value of networking. “My work experience as general manager of an agricultural company in China gave me many government and business connections,” he says.
 
When one of Ji’s customers in China suddenly left the seafood business, “he introduced me to his friend, who is one of China’s main seafood importers,” Ji explains. “He said he trusted me and believed in the quality of the products.”
 
“If you treat people with sincerity, they give back the same,” he continues. “Mutual trust is more important than anything else. Success means to be recognized by your partners and clients.” Read more

​Ayham Daas – Atlantic Doors

Ayham Daas brings more than 20 years’ experience in business and engineering to his role as investing partner in Atlantic Doors. The company supplies top-of-the-line commercial and residential doors to customers across the Island, with certification proving their commitment to quality and safety.
 
Back in 2017, when Daas relocated with his family from Dubai, the PEI Connectors program provided wings that helped the company get off the ground. “They were angels!” he says, estimating that the program reduced the time needed to start the company “from three years to one.” PEI Connectors meant networking was much easier: “They organized lots of events, lectures, meetings – I asked if I could meet specialists in the construction business, and they made it happen. I want to thank them for all their help.”

Daas is thrilled the business is succeeding: “It makes me want to spend more time helping the business grow. I am very proud that I started from zero and built a business with the highest standards.” That the company has become one of the top three door specialists on PEI is testament to their commitment to service and safety. Read more

​Sabine & Michael Schoenknecht – Lucky Bee Homestead & Atlantic Mustard Mill

Sabine Schoenknecht, co-owner of Lucky Bee Homestead and Atlantic Mustard Mill, sums up her first impression of PEI: “Magical!” she says. “And it still is!”
 
Sabine and her husband Michael have created their own magic since buying their farm in Murray Harbour North in 2013. After the chicken coop, they put in a garden. To their delight, “It produced so much, we could sell some of it!” Now they have 15 hens and several beehives, which produce honey they sell at the Charlottetown Farmer’s Market. They also have jams and various condiments – including 35 flavours of authentic German mustard available in shops throughout the Maritimes. And the farm runs on solar power. Read more

​Rona Yang, Canada Kinetic Intelligent, Inc.

In early 2016, Rona Yang placed ads in local papers for a figure-skating coach for KZ Skating School, one side of her company, Canada Kinetic Intelligent, Inc.. But nobody replied. So Rona reached out to her PEI Connectors contact. “Amy was happy to help,” Rona says. “One week later, she said, ‘I found a coach, would you like to meet her?’”
 
That coach was Kim Duffy, who is a level-three certified figure-skating coach. Of her more than 36 years of experience, four have been with Kinetic Intelligent as Coach Director.
The school’s first program began in November 2016. Now they offer several programs, including learn-to-skate and competitive figure-skating at the CanSkate and Star Skate levels. Not to mention 300 registered skaters and more than 20 coaches – and in 2017, membership in Skate Canada. “We’ve grown a lot in a short time!” both women state proudly.
 
Among their many accomplishments is helping competitive figure skaters get ice time. “Before, they had to buy tickets for ice time and didn’t have regular access,” Kim explains. “Many had to leave PEI to train.” Because Kinetic Intelligent books time at arenas across PEI, “now, those skaters can stay year-round with their families.”
 
“It makes people very happy,” Rona adds with a huge smile. Read more

Riley Aiello (Client & Connector)

Riley Aiello’s journey to post-secondary employment began during his time as a summer intern with PEI Network under the Greater Charlottetown Area Chamber of Commerce. Holland College’s Learning Manager, Brenda Compton, connected Riley to the program manager of PEI Network, Alana Walsh. As part of his duties, Riley worked at the PEI Network booth during a job fair put on by Skills PEI. That was where he got talking with Gloria Welton of the Employment Journey of PEI, a magazine created to highlight job opportunities found throughout Prince Edward Island, and provide resources for both employers and potential employees.

Gloria learnt of his interest in human resources and informed him of an opening at the Construction Association of PEI. At that same fair, he got introduced to Sam Sanderson, who oversaw the hiring. A few months later, Riley accepted a position as the human resources advisor of the Construction Association of PEI (CAPEI). Read more

Teresa Tu (Connector)

Teresa Tu’s dedicated involvement with the international student body at UPEI. She was a member of the UPEISU Student Council, where she represented the interests of international students attending UPEI. Teresa also worked at the International Student Office and served as coordinator of the UPEI Buddy program, where she organized efforts to help international students integrate better into UPEI and Canadian society, by befriending and mentoring new students.

She moved to Canada from China to study business administration, and the connections she made by immersing herself in the local community helped her land a role as a program officer at the PEI Office of Immigration.

Daniel Ohaegbu (Connector)

Daniel Ohaegbu moved from the capital city of Nigeria, Abuja, to Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island to begin his university education. When Christmas came and several international students could not make it back home, Daniel’s solution was to throw a party in a small apartment in a residential area. Eventually, the crowd was shown the door because of noise complaints. That was the first, not the last party. With time, the crowd grew and began to include more locals. That’s how Overtime Entertainment was born. So far, it has grown to include Jonah Chininga, whose background in business from UPEI supports the vision.

Overtime Entertainment now aims to give people more than just a good time. It works to promote diversity and inclusion through social interaction. It is completing a residency at the Startup Zone, hosted events for Black History Month and more. Daniel did all of this while completing an honors program in psychology at UPEI. He was nominated for the 2019 Fusion Awards under Arts and Culture. Daniel and his team show that with passion and diligence, dreams are valid and viable in PEI.

Dawn Binns (Connector)

When Dawn Binns first volunteered with Big Brothers Big Sisters, she only wanted to make connections in her new home province. She grew up in Hantsport, Nova Scotia and moved to PEI once she obtained her Bachelor of Education degree from Acadia University in 1998. Using skills she acquired from her degree, she became a facilitator with the Adult Connections in Education (ACE) program at UPEI. As she worked, she became more interested in adding value to the community and did so through volunteering. Her first key role at Big Brothers Big Sisters was Bowl for Kids Sake, the organization’s fundraiser. In this role, she helped with marketing and communications, and did the same while volunteering with the Canadian Cancer Society.

Interestingly, these roles indicated what her job in the future would be. Volunteering helped her meet people and provided opportunities to blend her education with real-world experience. Today, Dawn is the Managing Partner of Insight Brand and Marketing Studio and serves as the 2019—2020 Board President of the Greater Charlottetown Area Chamber of Commerce. She continues to serve in different roles, and as a connector throughout the Island community and beyond.

Jessica & Mike Fritz – Maritime Marzipan ( Client)

When Jessica Fritz served a fruit tart with marzipan filling, people raved. So when she couldn’t find the marzipan on P.E.I., she became concerned. Then she became inspired. “Why can’t we just bring it to Canada — starting with P.E.I.?”

Jessica and Mike Fritz have since launched Maritime Marzipan, which sells treats made from the tempting smooth mixture of sweetened ground almonds. “Everybody loves sweets, right?” says Mike, standing in the couple’s new summer shop at St. Peter’s Landing.

The couple’s love of food helped prompt their move to P.E.I. Jessica not only enjoys cooking, but also writing about food and exploring foods from other cultures.

“I somehow infected Mike with that,” she says.

Seacy Pan – Formfree Branding ( Client)

When Seacy Pan and Ray Cai brought Formfree Branding to Charlottetown, they created more than a new branding, printing and photography studio. They created another support service for newcomer entrepreneurs.

“We can become a connector with Chinese people and local people,” explains Pan, chatting at Formfree on the lower level of the Confederation Court Mall.

“Most of our clients are Chinese,” Cai explains. “We have no language block. We can talk directly to them.”

This husband-and-wife team operated Formfree for about two decades as a design studio in Guangzhou, a city of approximately 14 million people in southern China. Seeking a more relaxed pace of life, the couple emigrated with their son to P.E.I. in 2015 and set up Formfree in May 2016.

Nguyet Hoang – Ivy Furniture ( Client)

When Nguyet Hoang moved to Prince Edward Island, she found few places to buy solid wood furniture with classic lines.

“I haven’t seen such kind of furniture here,” she explains, sitting at a dining table in a store showcasing polished pieces in rich dark caramel tones.

“There should be room for me to enter this market,” she says.

Nguyet “Ivy” Hoang entered this market in early 2018, when she opened Ivy Furniture on the main floor of the Confederation Court Mall. Her shop offers living room, bedroom, dining room and library furniture crafted in her native country of Vietnam and imported to P.E.I. She describes the furniture construction as more traditional, the design more classic — reminding some Islanders of the Victorian furniture from a beloved grandmother’s home.

Michèle & Hubert Lihrmann – La Petite France ( Client)

When Michèle Lihrmann moved into her Victorian home in Alberton, she knew she had to open it to visitors. “We couldn’t buy this house, close the door and live inside,” she says. “That’s not possible to live like this.”

That’s because Michèle and her husband, Hubert, had purchased an Alberton landmark with a history filled with community connections and fondly remembered gatherings. Built in the 1890s for Fred L. Rogers, the Rogers House has over the years provided a home for a member of parliament, David MacDonald; and a lodge for senior citizens.

Lihrmann chats in the parlour, where the upright piano promises to entertain, and the antique furniture begs a visitor to sit and stay awhile.

Farah Jahandideh & Jabbar Pourbahman–Café Thomas - Martin ( Client)

Jabbar Pourbahman will quickly divulge the secret to success at Café Thomas-Martin.
“My wife makes everything here,” he says, as he slices chicken breast in the kitchen. “But I help her,” he adds with a smile.

Jabbar and his wife, Farah Jahandideh, have owned this downtown Charlottetown café since 2015. Glass cases and containers at the counter tempt visitors with baking from Farah’s kitchen.

Today, customers can indulge in peach-mango or raspberry muffins or molasses spice, peanut butter or “everything but the kitchen sink” cookies; or order salads, all-day breakfast, or sandwiches on Farah’s homemade bread.

“I’m too busy,” Farah says with a laugh.

Aman Sedighi – A - OK Gardens ( Client)

Aman Sedighi walked into Papa Joe’s with a small bowl of produce — and a desire to make a sale.

But the Iranian immigrant had no idea what to charge the Charlottetown restaurant for the fresh dill, cilantro, zucchini and tomatoes he had grown on a small plot of land. Sedighi thought he would be happy with $5 or $10. As a sharp entrepreneur, he asked the chef what he would pay.

“Around thirty dollars,” Chef Irwin offered.

“I’m not giving it to you for less than fifty!” Sedighi replied.

The pair bartered to $40, and Sedighi launched his foray into his farming business in P.E.I.

Five years later, his A-OK Gardens has grown from a plot on the dairy farm where he used to work to the 15 acres he now grows in Brookfield — plus another 91 acres for possible expansion.

Hamid Sanayie – Fry Factory ( Client)

When Hamid Sanayie moved to Prince Edward Island, he found it strange that so many restaurants served frozen French fries. “Being in the Island, which is famous for the potato, I wondered how come everybody used frozen fries here,” Sanayie explains. “Then I realized, if they want a fresh potato, they have to cut it by hand.”

As president of Fry Factory, Sanayie hopes to change that — not only in P.E.I. but across North America. His company manufactures an automatic fry-cutting machine that can turn a 50-pound bag of potatoes into fries in just one minute.

“Doing that by hand takes too much time,” he says. Instead of pressing potato after potato through a manual cutter, the operator of the Fry Factory machine simply loads piles of potatoes into the top and then sees the machine spin out a shower of fries.

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